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Continuous Supplematary Wefts : Khit

Continuous supplementary weft is the process of placing a supplementary yarn into the web of tabby weave, passing from selvage to selvage thus enabling the use of a shuttle for the supplementary yarns. The result is a pattern in one colour that floats on the surface of the weave. When the supplementary yarns are metallic, such as gold or silver, the term “brocade” is used. The supplementary yarns are placed into the weave by the assistance of special shafts that raise the warp to a certain pattern allowing the supplementary yarns to be placed alternately with the tabby weave yarns. Prior to the invention of the special shafts, shed sticks were placed in the warp to indicate the pattern for the supplementary yarns, thus restricting the repeat of the design to one repeat of the exact same pattern. The use of the shafts allowed for endless repeats of the exact same pattern. In Thailand khit is woven mainly by the Lao groups in the northeast for blankets, shoulder cloths and pillows. In Lanna, the Tai Lue and Tai Yuan weave Khit for bedsheets, phachet luand (banners) and tung temple banners). Well known designs include lai dok chan (sandle-wood flowers), lai dok keo (jasmine flowers), lai chang (elephants), lai ma (horses) and lai prasat (monuments).

Textiles Sample
Pha Biang1
Shoulder cloth used by women to wear to the temple of for special occasions called pha biang. In Thai pha sabai. The motif in the central field is called lai kachae meaning key pattern, a design originating in China.
Pha Biang2
Shoulder cloth used by women in the Lao court called pha biang. In Thai pha sabai. This style of cloth was influenced by the blankets of the Tai Daeng and adapted for court use. The motif in the central field is called lai kachae meaning key pattern, a design originating in China.
Tung1
A Buddhist banner called tung woven to make merit and offered to the temple for the deceased or for the Buddha. The motifs used are monuments, human figures riding elephants or walking holding flower wreaths, typical of ancestor worship.
Tung2
End part of a Buddhist banner called tung woven to make merit and offered to the temple for the deceased. The motifs used are similar to the pre-Buddhist pha chet luang designs.
Sin Mai Kham1
Woman’s tubeskirt called sin mai kham. This was the style of tubeskirt of the Chiang Tung court. This piece has been restored and most recently with new bright metal buttons at the hem. The waist band is newly added.
Sin Mai Kham2
Woman’s tubeskirt called sin mai kham belonging to Chao Thipawan Na Chiang Tung. This was the style of tubeskirt of the Chiang Tung court and was given to Chao Thipawan, a Lampang princess, as an engagement gift which she took with her when she became part of the Chiang Tung court. This piece has been recently restored.
Sin Pong or Sin Kham Khuep
Tubeskirt for women for ceremonial occasions called sin pong or sin kham khuep. The structure of this skirt is called sin pong indicating evenly spaced banding. Motifs include eight-pointed stars called dok chan, squares called lai ta laew pin and upside-down nak, with fringe pattern called lai sai yoi.
Sin Muk Tor Tin Chok
Woman’s tubeskirt called sin muk tor tin chok.The supplementary warp here is imitating the lai dok khia pattern of the same group. The hem has dok mon siphok motifs.
Sin Tin Chok or Sin Mai Kham or Sin Kham Khuep or Sin Khuep
Tubeskirt for women for ceremonial occasions called sin tin chok or sin mai kham or sin kham khuep or sin khuep. This is normally sewn with a red cotton waist band.
Sin Mai Yok Din
Tubeskirt for court women called sin mai yok din. Indian fabrics were imported to Lanna via Myanmar.
Sin Man
Tubeskirt for women called sin man. This skirt employs two side-seams in order to arrange the pattern in the horizontal when worn. Motifs of mythical birds and ancestor figures adorn the hem which is woven in one with the main body.
Sin Kham Khuep or Sin Kuep
Tubeskirt for women for ceremonial occasions called sin kham khuep or sin khuep, typical Nan style. The structure of this skirt is called sin pong indicating evenly spaced banding. The red ground colour gives the impression of a separate hem, but it is all in one.
Pha Chet Luang
Cloth called pha chet luang woven to make merit and offered to the temple for the deceased. These cloths look like the Buddhist tung banners. The motifs used are pre-Buddhist designs and reflect past beliefs of the people in animism when these cloths were used in spirit appeasing ceremonies where they were hung as long banners honoring the ancestors.
Pha Lop
Bedsheet called pha lop which has not yet been sewn from the loom. The motifs woven in red and indigo cotton show nak, dok keo, hooks and dogs’ teeth.
Pha Laep
Sleeping or sitting cloth called pha laep. Today these cloths are used as multi purpose cloths such as for a coffin cover, wall hangings or baby blanket and is sometimes called pha pu.
Pha Pok Hoa
Man’s head cloth called pha pok hoa. In the past men wore these head cloths on various occasions but today it is only seen in the Buddhist ordination ceremony.
Pha Chet
Man’s shoulder cloth called pha chet for ceremonial use. These cloths were woven as love-gifts that young women gave to their lovers.
Pha Kang(Pha Man)
Curtain called pha kang. In Thai: pha man. This cloth was used as a wall hanging at a man’s Buddhist ordination ceremony.
Pha Bing
Shoulder cloth used by women to wear to the temple of for special occasions called pha bing. The Phutai fold these cloths into four to make a narrow cloth which goes over one shoulder and over the breast. It was used as a head cloth for women in the past for various special occasions.
Pha Hom (Pha Tum Luk)
Part of a blanket used as a light travelling blanket for men called pha hom or as a baby wrap it is called pha tum luk. The original structure of these blankets is to join two pieces like this together length-wise.

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